Five Strategies For Maintaining Healthy Revenue During An EHR Transition

Five Strategies for Maintaining Healthy Revenue During An EHR Transition

  • February 29, 2016

You’ve heard the horror stories. Now hear how making clinical and financial data “inseparable” can help ensure a smooth migration that doesn’t blow up the revenue cycle. By David Dyke and Carmen Deguzman Sessoms Your EHR migration can cost you twice. But the second cost is avoidable if you know where to look and what to do. The first cost is obvious. It’s the cost of the migration itself, which, for hospitals, can run from under $10,000 to over $50,000 per physician, with ongoing monthly fees of $300 to $700 per doctor. For a large provider network, that can mean…

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Beware The EHR “Ripple Effect”

Beware the EHR “Ripple Effect”

  • February 29, 2016

EHR conversions can be complicated and disruptive. So don’t make them more problematic by making unnecessary changes to revenue cycle management systems. By David Dyke Like any major IT system implementation, an EHR conversion can be seriously disruptive to hospital operations—and finances. In addition to the many technical and clinical considerations of these projects, hospitals and health systems typically face an array of revenue cycle implications that may pose significant financial risks. Most of the pitfalls, however, are entirely avoidable, and those providers that align the technical, clinical, and financial elements of the project from the start can convert a…

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Getting In Front Of The Problem: How Can Hospitals Empower Denial Prevention And Management?

Getting in Front of the Problem: How Can Hospitals Empower Denial Prevention and Management?

  • November 22, 2015

Healthcare providers are chiefly concerned with two things: Ensuring patients receive the highest quality of care, and getting paid for that care. Despite advances in medical technology and a declining number of uninsured Americans, hospitals still experience difficulty getting paid fully and in a timely manner today. Hospital and health system CEOs have named financial challenges as their No. 1 concern every year from 2012 to 2014, according to the American College of Healthcare Executives.1 Claim denials are a significant contributor to these challenges. Denials are a pervasive and persistent problem, as up to 1 in 5 claims is delayed or…

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Revenue Cycle Payment Clarity

Revenue Cycle Payment Clarity

  • April 10, 2015

What It Is, Why It Matters, and How It Can Help Your Patients and Your Bottom Line Healthcare providers today are principally concerned with two things: first and foremost, providing quality care to patients; second, getting paid for that care. Unfortunately, while advances in medical science and technology are making it easier to help patients get well, a tidal wave of reform is making it harder to get paid. Higher deductible plans and cost sharing mean that insured patients owe more. And as patient out-of-pocket expenses rise, so will the amount of bad debt carried by hospitals. Hospitals’ total cost…

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The Top 10 Things Payers And Providers Can Do Today To Start Aligning With VBR Tomorrow

The Top 10 Things Payers and Providers Can Do Today to Start Aligning with VBR Tomorrow

  • March 11, 2015

CMS says VBR is now an imperative. What can you do to make the grade? By Carolyn J. Wukitch and Andrei Gonzales, M.D. The stakes have just been raised for payers and providers who are besieged by a rapidly changing market. In an announcement that reverberated throughout healthcare, HHS Secretary Sylvia M. Burwell introduced an initiative to make alternative payment the standard for 50% of Medicare reimbursement by 2018. That’s the first time HHS established goals for alternative payment models for Medicare. HHS wants 30% of fee-for-service payments to be tied to quality or value through ACOs, bundled payment, or…

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How We Can Make Healthcare Payment And Delivery Reform Work

How We Can Make Healthcare Payment and Delivery Reform Work

  • January 9, 2015

Powerful incentives and inertia remain intact, limiting stakeholders’ willingness to experiment with the range of innovative reimbursement models that promise to make the effort and cost of reform worthwhile. The result: growing agreement that transition to a system that fosters experimentation with mixed reimbursement schemes is required to ease away from the existing FFS model and the entrenched processes and technologies that are already in place. It’s said that imminent execution concentrates the mind. It could also be said that the looming specter of draconian cuts to healthcare, and their financial impact on stakeholders, are driving innovation in payment and…

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